European Union pressure on Israel for a two-state solution to the Palestinian conflict

European Union pressure on Israel for a two-state solution to the Palestinian conflict

European Union is intensifying its pressure on Israel to accept a two-state solution as the only way to resolve the conflict with the Palestinians in a lasting way. Several countries, including Spain and Belgium, are leading this initiative and have presented a comprehensive peace plan that establishes the creation of a Palestinian state alongside the Israeli state as a non-negotiable element.

Although the official position of the EU-27 is limited to calling for “humanitarian pauses”, more and more Member States consider the number of Palestinian civilians killed to be intolerable.

EU position and pressure on Israel

European Union has made clear its support for a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Spain and Belgium have led efforts on behalf of the EU, and Spain has proposed holding a preparatory peace conference to lay the groundwork for a final negotiation.

This proposal has been supported by other member countries, such as Italy and France, which find the numbers of Palestinian civilians killed in the conflict unacceptable. The EU has urged Israel to accept an immediate ceasefire and to allow unconditional humanitarian access to Gaza.

EU has also raised the possibility of imposing sanctions on those who refuse to accept a Palestinian state as key to peace. Palestinian Foreign Minister Riyad al-Maliki has urged the EU-27 to sanction Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, arguing that his rejection of Palestinian statehood is unacceptable.

Proposal for a preparatory peace conference

The proposal for a preparatory peace conference has been supported by Spain and other member countries of the European Union. This conference would aim to lay the groundwork for a final negotiation of a two-state solution.

Although a date for the conference has not yet been set, both Spain and Belgium have expressed their willingness to host it.

Spanish Foreign Minister José Manuel Albares has defended the idea of a preparatory peace conference and stressed the importance of an independent Palestinian state coexisting in peace with Israel.

Albares stressed that both Palestinians and Israelis have a right to peace and security, and that a two-state solution is beneficial for both sides and for the stability of the Middle East region.

Difficulty of the peace process and Israel’s position

The peace process to reach a two-state solution faces numerous challenges. Israeli Foreign Minister Israel Katz has shown little interest in recognizing a Palestinian state and has put forward proposals that are unrelated to the ongoing discussion.

This has led to criticism from European ministers, who find the Israeli government’s rejection of Palestinian statehood unacceptable.

Despite the difficulties, all European Union member countries agree that a two-state solution is fundamental to achieving peace in the region. Spain and other countries have presented a 12-point peace plan that stresses the importance of starting to prepare a comprehensive plan that guarantees the peaceful and secure coexistence of both states.

This plan also highlights the need to work on humanitarian aid, the release of hostages and the recovery of affected communities.

Conclusions and future prospects

European Union continues to press Israel to accept a two-state solution as the only way to resolve the conflict with the Palestinians. Although the official position of the EU-27 is limited to calling for “humanitarian pauses”, more and more member countries are showing their support for a two-state solution and finding the numbers of Palestinian civilians killed in the conflict intolerable.

Spain and Belgium have proposed holding a preparatory peace conference to lay the groundwork for a final negotiation, and other member countries are also backing this initiative.

Despite the difficulties and resistance from Israel, the European Union insists on the importance of a two-state solution. The proposal for a 12-point peace plan stresses the need to work on humanitarian aid, the release of hostages and the recovery of affected communities.

Although the road to peace is arduous, the European Union and other member countries remain committed to pursuing and working towards a lasting solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.