Immigration Issues in the Third Presidential Debate: Beyond the Mexican Border

Immigration Issues in the Third Presidential Debate: Beyond the Mexican Border

Immigration has been one of the hottest topics in the U.S. presidential campaign, and during the third debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, both candidates addressed the issue from different perspectives.

However, it is important to understand that the migration issue is not only limited to the Mexican border, but has its roots in the poverty, political instability and endemic violence that affects Mexico and Central America.

Origin of the migration problem

Mexican migration to the United States is a complex historical phenomenon that has been largely driven by increased violence and poverty in the country.

According to the Social Panorama of Latin America 2015 study, Mexico is one of the three countries, along with Guatemala and Venezuela, where poverty grew the most between 2014 and 2015. In addition, violence in Mexico has reached alarming levels, with an average of 55 people murdered every day.

The situation in Mexico is further aggravated by the cuts the United States has made in support for combating drug trafficking in the country. Despite the dire situation, five million dollars earmarked for the fight against the cartels was suspended this year due to human rights concerns.

Causes of Central American migration

Central American migration to the United States has begun to increase in recent years, and migrants do not always have the ultimate goal of reaching U.S. territory. Many of them are seeking to flee the poverty, violence and political instability affecting Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras, countries known as the Northern Triangle of Central America.

These three countries have some of the highest homicide rates in the world. In Honduras, for example, the homicide rate stood at 64 per 100,000 inhabitants in 2015, while in El Salvador it was 108. Violence and lack of opportunity have driven thousands of people to flee their homes in search of a better future.

U.S. Response

During the presidential debate, both Clinton and Trump traded accusations and proposals regarding immigration. Trump insisted on the need to build a wall on the border with Mexico and on deporting undocumented immigrants, while Clinton favored immigration reform and criticized her opponent’s extreme positions.

However, none of the proposals presented really address the root causes of migration. The United States, as a neighboring country and major trading partner of Mexico and Central America, needs to take a more active role in finding long-term solutions to poverty, violence and political instability in the region.

Beyond the Border: The Humanitarian Crisis in Central America

Violence and poverty in Central America’s Northern Triangle have created a humanitarian crisis that requires a comprehensive response from the governments of the region and the United States.

It is essential that policies be implemented to improve the socioeconomic conditions of the population and to guarantee security and respect for human rights.

The Alliance for Prosperity, a plan presented by Central American countries to the United States, seeks precisely to improve socioeconomic conditions in the region and promote cooperation among the countries involved. However, it is necessary that the United States also assume its responsibility and provide the necessary support for this plan to be successful.

Conclusions

Migration problem in Mexico and Central America is a complex and multifaceted issue that requires a comprehensive response from the governments of the region and the United States.

It is essential to address the root causes of migration, such as poverty, violence and political instability, and to promote policies that improve the socio-economic conditions of the population.

In addition, it is important that the United States assume its responsibility as a neighboring country and major trading partner in the region and provide the necessary support so that Central American countries can effectively address the humanitarian crisis they are facing.

The solution does not lie in the construction of walls or the mass deportation of immigrants, but in cooperation and joint work between the countries involved. Only through a comprehensive and sustainable approach will we be able to find a lasting solution to the migration problem in the region.