Spain insists on lifting sanctions against Venezuela despite electoral coup against María Corina Machado

Spain insists on lifting sanctions against Venezuela despite electoral coup against María Corina Machado

Government of Spain continues its strategy of whitewashing the Bolivarian revolution by proposing the revision of the sanctions imposed by the European Union (EU) against Venezuela.

Despite the judicial coup perpetrated by the government of Nicolás Maduro, which confirmed the disqualification of opposition candidate María Corina Machado, the Minister of Foreign Affairs, José Manuel Albares, insists on the need to review these measures.

Meanwhile, the United States is reviewing its own sanctions following the Bolivarian onslaught, which includes the arrest of members of Vente Venezuela, Machado’s party, falsely accused of participating in a military conspiracy.

Spain and the review of sanctions

In his appearance before the Foreign Affairs Committee of the Congress of Deputies, Minister Albares reaffirmed his proposal to review the European sanctions against Venezuela. According to Albares, the EU cannot ignore that these sanctions are a means and not an end, and therefore, they must be reviewed.

Despite the judicial coup against the presidential elections and the disqualification of Machado, the minister insists on his position.

On the other hand, the EU High Representative for Foreign Policy, Josep Borrell, issued a statement expressing his concern about the recent events in Venezuela and the ratification of the disqualification of opposition politicians. Borrell emphasized that this situation undermines democracy and the rule of law.

However, he left open the possibility of welcoming the fact that both parties remain in the negotiation process established by the Barbados Agreement.

United States is reviewing its sanctions

Unlike Spain, the United States is reviewing its own energy sanctions against the Bolivarian revolution. After accepting a prisoner swap, the US government made public that it is reviewing these decisions due to the Bolivarian onslaught, which includes the detention of members of Vente Venezuela, María Corina Machado’s party.

These members have been falsely accused of participating in a military conspiracy.

Spain’s position contrasts with that of the U.S.

While Spain insists on lifting sanctions against Venezuela, the United States is reviewing its own. Albares’ words, in which he shows a restrained contrariness towards the events in Venezuela, contrast with Borrell’s statement, who emphasized the EU’s concern and the “undermining” of democracy and the rule of law.

Despite this, Borrell is pleased that both parties remain in the negotiation process.

Conclusions

Spanish government continues its strategy of whitewashing the Bolivarian revolution by insisting on the revision of European sanctions against Venezuela. Despite the judicial coup against the presidential elections and the disqualification of opposition candidate María Corina Machado, Minister Albares defends the need to review these measures.

Meanwhile, the United States is reviewing its own sanctions after the Bolivarian onslaught. Spain’s position contrasts with that of the United States, and the words of its representatives show different degrees of concern and displeasure with the events in Venezuela.